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OMG MUST MEAN SOMETHING

 

050614WP

A couple of months ago I mentioned my smart phone in a blog post. I cast aspersions on the idea of it being used as a performance tracking device, and promoted the idea of riding in one’s own version of reality, enjoying whatever pace you feel was achieved without the need to have data to support it.

And that concept was popular - we got a lot of feedback from all sorts of people saying yup, that’s how we roll.

So when I got an email this week from a friend that connected me to this map of everybody’s activities as recorded by Strava, I have to admit to being blindsided by the brilliance of it.

Here was an application of the data sharing on the web that I had never thought of, because I had not engaged in it.

Now I have seen this map, I have to get into the rest of this whole datalogjam to find out what else I have been missing.

Excuse me if this is old hat to you, but back to the map itself: I accept that this info is skewed because it only shows where people who use Strava went. Or the NSA tracks us by our tooth fillings, and it only shows where everybody born before fluoridation went.

But even allowing for the incomplete dataset, its interesting.

In our patch, it provides a good snapshot of the trails that get the most traffic. As we had long suspected: here was proof that for this user group anyway, the mighty Split Enz / Pondy New / RollerCoaster run looks to be the most popular.

From further out in space, you get a clear idea of just how many of us there are, leaving our little glowing trails on roads and trails all over the place. Its awesome!

You can identify hotspots and iconic rides. Moerangi is bizarre, a line that shows up with the telltale redness of repeat visits, in glorious isolation. The Timber Trail is similar, traced by countless bike riders but unconnected to anything else.

The route of the Nzo Karioi Classic, coming up on July 27, traces the outline of Mt Karioi near Raglan. That is inspiration to participate right there: a wiggly line, literally drawn on a map, by bike riders!